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excellent idea. unfortunately, only one-third of that is going to be used. so $200 million is going to go unspent that can go out and serve unserved america today. the same issue will be in front of us in 2013. that's what windstream's waiver is all about, is there other ways to think about this other than setting the 775 limit. and beyond that i think getting on to the model that we need going forward for universal service funding. the industry, the usta has put forth a model, but the fcc has to come up with their own model which will drive caf ii is what we're calling it, the connect america fund 2, so that's where the biggest bang for the buck will be in our business. because remember, as we looked at these more than minor changes in the financials of the telephone companies across the country, it was so important that we do these two things coincidentally. we kind of got a little bit out of sync. we've gotten one done very effectively, efficiently and fast. it's happen realtime, it's showing up in the numbers today, we've just got to work this usf thing out x it's about the cons
to be a bigger and more difficult issue and it deserves more than 10 seconds, but particularly the attacks on u.s. corporations and intellectual property is the core problem. on some national dialogue i think it's a very interesting interesting subject and a great question. i think there's a lot that could be done in the investment area and relating to that in the ipr area. it's been more successful at the subnational level than the national level. governors and china want to invest more than their national governments want to encourage it. and, perhaps you can use leverage to improve icr performance at the regional level in china which is where the real problem lies oic real possibilities here. >> please join me in thanking this terrific panel. [applause] >> could i just note it as was mentioned before we have a really exceptional book event opportunity nine days from that day in the afternoon on wednesday, november 28. we will be putting out an announcement. thank you. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversation
about doing this with yemen, too which is of course in an area of the u.s. and saudi arabia to cooperate a lot on counterterrorism, on the gcc initiative to get the power not only the thing is how do you get this desperately poor country running out of everything all but once given the chance to get back on its feet. we are still working together on that. the big issues you to brief the next secretary on our iran sanctions and syria. the imposition of the current set of sanctions wouldn't have been possible without such a deal last november but if the sanctions led to iran losing up to or a little more than half of its oil exports, with saudi arabia be willing to step in and make those exports and i think with a caveat that we probably can't make up all of iran's exports whether it be a mechanism to totally shut them down because that would take the saudi production right up and leave no spare capacity which tends to be a driver for the higher oil prices. so, as the sanctions have come about, we had some bumps in the oil market particularly in the spring in anticipation, but as they've b
in a way that human and dogs have used for centuries -- >> so we've had a lot of discussion about whether it's 5 minutes or 15 minutes or whether it's mothballs, i understood the issue to be with us under the fourth amendment whether or not it is a search for the dog to come up to the door and sniff. we're not making a judgment on the probable cause, but the ground of the decision below was this is a search when the dog sniffs. >> you need probable cause just for the dog to sniff. no, that's a absolutely right. and the dog's sniff itself clearly is not a physical invasion in the same way that looking is not a physical invasion under the common law -- >> it isn't the sniffing in the abstract, it's the sniffing at this point. the sniffing at a person's front door, right? >> well, i mean, that's true, your honor, but i think if it wasn't a search for the police officer to walk up there and sniff and report smelling live marijuana, then it wasn't a search when frankie walked up there and alerted to the presence of an illegal narcotic. >> well, i didn't say it wouldn't be a search if the polic
nations, was the weight to get alongside these afghans, and we saw -- i was in kabul when the two u.s. officers were shot in the national military police coordination center in the moi. there was an absolute bizarre for those who were present on the day to -- doug touched on this as proximity with the afghans, and it's very often the best form of defending against this form of attack. >> [inaudible] >> general, will you be able to achieve a successful withdrawal of u.k. combat troops by the end of 2014. >> i absolutely understand the investments, and there's a lot of material. my headquarters absolutely understand how much we have got to move over the time? >> the overall general plan of withdrawal, will you be able to be successful do you think? >> yes, i will. noting, of course, that the national operation is inside a wider nato operation, and a great deal of work is being done in nato to deliver that coordination. >> thanks. >> i want the to ask along the table, are we seriously led to believe that on the january the 1st, 2015, that the afghan national security forces will be susta
that is not a foreign policy. you know, it sounds like he's talking about the u.s. being out front first, and the you know, the rest being alone. i think this administration came in and found a number of our alliances and partnerships afraid in the post-iraq period because of, you know, the previous years and the previous administration. and i think this president has sought to adopt an approach to american leadership that really inspires and enabled others to step up and contribute alongside us. on the theory that that collective action on the part of the international community is much more effective in dealing with the kind of threats and challenges that we face today. you can see it in the 49 nation coalition that's been built in afghanistan. you can see it with regard to how we've gone after al qaeda globally with partners on the ground. we can see it in the most crippling sanctions regime ever put in place with regard to iran, where countries like china and russia, along with our traditional allies and a number of other states across the world have stepped up to impose the sanctions together. a
some cures and some scientific breakthroughs, like jim was talking about, that would move us beyond just saying we're going to have to cut medicare by $10 trillion over the next 50 years. >> i'm going to let jonathan respond and then i will let each panelist say when prediction on what they see ahead. jonathan. >> the question becomes do people want to work together. and politically if we think we can do better by opposing everything, you oppose everything. and politically think you can do better by working out deals the way gingrich and republican-led congress worked out deals with bill clinton. they will work that. as a matter of both sides willing to come to the table and give-and-take. >> so that was a very fast. like a journalist. version of what's going on. stand, predictions? >> i think the surprise -- surprise. maybe what happens with health care. health care reform and implantation of health care reform. because we talked about this as if there isn't other people. there are so many people who are in either in the process of or have to make decisions about going forward on h
-span. up next, a house debate with u.s. representative and former republican presidential candidate michele bachmann and her democratic challenger, jim graves to represent minnesota's 6th congressional district. then at 9 a.m. eastern we are live with an analysis of the competitive house and senate races with two former congressmen, republican tom davis and democrat martin who each chaired their respective parties' campaign committees. >> when i watch c-span, i watch the morning journal. i like the give and take there. i like the balanced approach. and i also like to hear the callers. i don't call myself, but i like to hear the callers. some of them are unusual, to say the least. some of them are thought-provoking too. c-span is everywhere. c-span in washington is just at every event, you know, small hearing, public policy meeting downtown, c-span just seems to be there. >> steve austin watches c-span on verizon. c-span, created by america's cable companies in many 1979 -- in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> now, representative michele bachmann faces
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8